Meeting Louise McMonagle

Don’t double-take- this is not a magical christmas movie! It’s actually the amazing (and much more magical) Louise McMonagle. We’re so pleased to have Louise and her magnificent cello playing on our artistic board! Louise will be joining us at the recording sessions for our second album A Chest of Toys, which will be released in 2017. Take a peek at Louise’s website here, and find out where she stands on all the big issues of the day in our quick-fire interview below.

riot_louise

In what ways have you Rioted so far?

In my first Riot Ensemble concert I had to play my cello with an electric razor. That was a riot.

Teenage tearaway, or nerdy note-learner?

Definitely the tearaway I’m afraid. Just ask any of my school teachers …

Favourite musician?

Impossible question but I’ll go with Truls Mork, due to the sheer hours I clocked up listening to him when I was getting into the cello.

Favourite performance venue?

Royal Opera House – I love the theatre atmosphere.

People have said this about me …

“She wears a lot of yellow.”

Strictly or X Factor?

Neither … but at a push, Strictly.

The best 007 is …

Daniel Craig!

Salad cream or mayonnaise?

Both are food hell for me.

I would most like to Riot about …

… where to start …

A Chest of Toys: Real World Sessions

Dates: Friday 17th – Sunday 19th February
Venue: Real World Studios

Back in 2014, on Radio 4, comedian Mark Steel quoted an anonymous description of the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival: ‘Much of it sounds like a chest of children’s toys coming down the stairs.’

We think this is accidentally a wonderful description of the joyful, cacophonous and unpredictable musics that make up contemporary new music today, and we’re thrilled to be working with Coviello Music Productions to make our second CD recording – A Chest of Toys – for release on Coviello Contemporary in late 2017.

We’ll be recording Michael Cryne’s Celia’s Toyshop, and our 2016 Call for Scores commissions: In My Room (Yukiko Watanabe) and Florescence (Lee Westwood) alongside an array of other chamber music including Thomas Kotcheff’s death, hocket and roll for two toy pianos, Monica Pearce’s Kandinsky for soprano and toy piano, Television Continuity Poses by Jack Sheen, and Hayirli Olsun for Trombone, Harpischord, Percussion and Piano by Utku Asuroglu.

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